Resplendent

Finding a pebble in my shoe

I kissed it and called it beautiful

for not lying about what it was.

Kiss me, and I’ll call you diamond

to let you forget the part of yourself

that once was coal—

forget or burn away.

I have been waiting for this

 

Underwater, I swallowed sand

for so long I began to rust.

Scoop me up, pluck the pearl from my tongue

so I can ask:

Will you shed gemstones with me?

The weight of this shell is too much now—

peel back the gilded crust and

slide emeralds from our eyes.

We wore them for the way they shone in the sun,

but we are not jewelry any more.

We are sea glass,

and I see you glitter more when

the light comes clean through.

 

(c)Marie KR 2014

The Way I See It, #1

The way I see it, love is a choice.

At a different point in my life I subscribed to the notion of love as an irrevocable, external force—one which was beyond human control. Sounds exciting, doesn’t it? Most of society is somehow convinced of this at some point in our development: that when the time/person/universe was right, some mystical wave of emotion would sweep us off our feet and carry us off into the wonders of love. This is the metaphorical falling in love—it’s romantic, it’s fun, and it takes nearly zero effort on our part.

More recently, however, I’ve come to a few realizations which have caused me to reconsider my view of love and relationships. Primarily this refers to my new understanding of love as a personal, conscious choice. Think about it: it is much more meaningful to look at your current/future Significant Other, with all their flaws and shortcomings and habits and history, and to make a conscious decision that you still love them in spite of (or even because of) all of the aforementioned setbacks. This is the essence of loving willingly, rather than at the hands of some irreversible force akin to gravity. It is the act of choosing that empowers us to take control of life and stop waiting for it to take control of us.

Choose to love or choose not to love, but don’t you dare try to blame it on gravity.